Tagged ‘Ken Haedrich’

  • Harvest Pie with Autumn Leaves

    Here’s a pie I love to make when the leaves are turning, the pumpkins are crowding farm stand shelves, and the pie-baking bug has bitten me good. The filling is a real grab bag of fall favorites: sliced fresh apples and pears, diced pumpkin, and dried cranberries for extra sweetness and a splash of color. I use the pastry trimmings here to create a center spray of leaves. You can use a leaf cookie cutter, but even for someone as artistically challenged as myself, it’s no trouble to cut a basic narrow leaf shape—something simple, like a birch leaf, not a maple—and make a few veins in it with the back of a paring knife. I put four of these on the top crust, stems ends in the middle with the leaves pointing out to the 12, 3, 6, and 9 o’clock positions. This is the perfect pie for a fall outing or activity—a leaf-raking party or tailgate party, for instance. I love the juiciness of this pie, so I’d recommend serving it within an hour of baking. Do use a small sugar pie pumpkin, by the way—the larger ones tend to be too watery to use in a pie.

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  • Curried Winter Squash Galette with Onion & Apple

    When you write cookbooks, people often ask you how you come up with all of your recipe ideas. I like to say that I can find inspiration just about anywhere—from a photo, in my reading, during a casual conversation, or in my travels. Sometimes, inspiration for a new dish is borrowed from an “old” dish, in this case a warming curried winter squash and apple soup that I like to make in the fall and winter. Like the soup, this galette takes advantage of winter squash’s uncommon affinity for curry seasoning. The diced apple adds a sweet note, but the caramelized onions, curry, and Brie leave no doubt that this is a savory tart first, and one that would go beautifully with a salad of greens, toasted pecans, blue cheese, and vinaigrette.

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  • Yeasted Butter Pastry

    Most of the time, pie dough and pastry recipes don’t have any kind of leavening, and when they do, it is seldom yeast. Here’s one exception. This is a very easy dough to mix in the food processor. The kneading takes place right in the machine, followed by a quick hand kneading when you turn the dough out. It gets a partial rise at room temperature, with the second half of the rising in the fridge; the chill makes it easier to roll. Once baked, the texture of the crust is more biscuit-like than flaky pastry, so it’s a good choice for many large galettes, especially those with a fair amount of moisture. I always use this for the Curried Winter Squash Galette with Onion and Apple (page 130), but it would also be great for the Fresh Tomato and Pesto Galette (page 107).

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  • Dinner Pies

    From Shepherd's Pie and Cottage Pie to Tarts, Turnovers, Hand Pies, and More, with 100 Delectable and Foolproof Recipes
    Dinner Pies

    By Ken Haedrich

    Hardcover , $24.95

    Dinner pies. They are the ultimate in comfort food and highlight the increasingly popular trend in making pies from savory ingredients. at once easy enough for an “any-night-of-the- week” one-dish meal, and fancy enough to dress up for a weekend party, savory pies are a great way to get a complete dinner on the table with ease.

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  • Fancy Sweet Potato Pie

    Recipe: Fancy Sweet Potato Pie

    Summary: Sweet potato pie, a southern specialty, has been an American tradition for more than 100 years. Like pumpkin pie, sweet potato pie tends to have a meaty, firm-bodied texture, although the flavor is somewhat more delicate and elusive than pumpkin, and it has a lighter orange hue. Pie makers reach into their pumpkin pie bag of tricks to nudge a sweet potato pie toward greatness. The same pumpkin pie spices make the rounds in sweet potato pies, as well as eggs, milk or cream, and a good measure of sweetener in the form of molasses, brown sugar, or even maple syrup. Our fancy version is a little light on the spices, but we include orange zest—a festive touch—and an optional splash of hazelnut or almond liqueur, to give this earthy pie an appropriately nutty flavor. I think it’s best served cold, but it’s also very good warm.

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  • Lattice-Top Deep-Dish Sour Cherry Pie

    Lattice-Top Sour Cherry Pie

    Recipe: Lattice-Top Deep-Dish Sour Cherry Pie

    Summary: Sour cherries are prized for the wonderful pies they make. They have a special flavor and unique tartness not found in other types of cherries. In many parts of the country, the trickiest part of making a sour cherry pie is finding the cherries. Not only are they somewhat fragile, but their tartness isn’t embraced by consumers who, for the most part, expect cherries to be sweet. If your local supermarket doesn’t carry them, check farmers’ markets. The key to making a good sour cherry pie, I believe, is to add just enough sugar to tame the tartness, not overwhelm it. The other trick is to use sufficient thickening to gel the prodigious amount of juice. Other than that, I keep the filling fairly simple, with a little lemon juice and zest, a dab of butter, and a pretty lattice top so the bright red cherries can peek through. Do use an extra-deep-dish pie pan, if you have one. This is a very juicy pie, and the added depth will help contain the juice. MAKES 8 TO 10 SERVINGS

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  • Tyler Pie

    Recipe: Tyler Pie

    Summary: Tyler pie, sometimes called Tyler pudding pie, is said to be named for John Tyler, our 10th president. According to James Beard in his American Cookery (Little, Brown and Company, 1972), this sort of pie might have been called sugar pie in the South and maple sugar pie in the North, depending on the kind of sugar it was made with. In any event, it is basically a very sweet custard pie, typically—given the abundance of brown sugar and butter—with a caramel flavor. Like most early pies, there is nothing complicated about it: the ingredients are common, the mixing procedure simple and straightforward, and the results delicious.

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  • For the Home Baker

    This post is a part of The Harvard Common Press’s #BooksForCooks holiday giving campaign. For more information and gift ideas, click here.

    Pie // #BooksForCooks

    Haedrich’s Pie is the bible when it comes to putting together this American favorite. 300 tried-and-true recipes for everything from Apple and Peach to Carrot Custard and Winter Squash. It’s the ultimate pie-baker resource.

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  • Praiseworthy Pie

    It started with an ungodly amount of butter.

    Butter, that’s a staple, I must have thought, standing in the dairy section of the supermarket sometime in mid-winter.  Salted or unsalted?  I had neither, so why not both? I grabbed a four-pack of each, throwing expiration dates to the wind. Butter lasted far longer than produce.  Sure, I was one person, but I cooked. I baked.  I might need butter someday.

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  • National Cherry Pie Day

    According to a survey conducted last summer by NPR, apple is still the preferred pie flavor among Americans. Be that as it may, today is National Cherry Pie Day, and in honor of the holiday, we at The Harvard Common Press are de-throning apple and giving cherry its chance to shine.

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  • Apple Cherry Pie with Coconut Almond Crumb Topping

    apple cherry pie cocnut crumb topping

    Recipe: Apple Cherry Pie with Coconut Almond Crumb Topping


    • Crust:
    • 1 ⁄2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, at room temperature
    • 4 ounces cream cheese, at room temperature
    • 1 cup all-purpose flour

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  • Tis the season for pie…

    Recipe: Baked Apple Dumpling Pie

    Summary: If this pie sounds like a cross between baked apples and apple dumplings, well, it is. It’s baked with a top pastry only, which molds itself around the apples so handsomely that I don’t even bother to invert the pie, lest the pastry vanish beneath the apples. I use Golden Delicious apples here because they hold their shape well. They’re halved, cored, and placed in the pan in a pool of melted butter, brown sugar, and raspberry preserves. A raisin– brown sugar–walnut mixture is spooned into the hollowed cores, à la baked apples, then the pastry is draped over the top, and the pie is baked. Since this bakes up in individual mounds, you don’t slice it like a regular pie. Rather, you scoop out the mounds—which look like halved apple dumplings—and serve them with the pan juices. Excellent alone, but even better with chilled Vanilla Custard Sauce.

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